Oswald mugshot

New evidence and analysis suggest that Nikita Khrushchev ordered the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy, and the KGB arranged it.

Official investigations have discounted the likelihood of a Soviet hand in the assassination, and few outside investigators have pursued this line of inquiry.  But some observers have always considered the Soviets a likely suspect (Lyndon Johnson and other US Government officials evidently did, causing them to suppress any hint of a KGB conspiracy for fear that an outraged public would demand retaliation that would lead to war). The Soviets had a palpable, powerful motive: to gain revenge for the humiliation of Khrushchev and the USSR in the 1962 Cuban missile crisis.

Certainly, the idiosyncratic odyssey of Lee Harvey Oswald into the Soviet Union and a Russian marriage as well as his contacts with Soviet diplomatic offices preceding the assassination afforded the KGB many opportunities to interact with him. In a sense, therefore, the KGB is the elephant in the living room of suspects in this case. Yet repeated investigations have failed to turn up specific evidence that would implicate the KGB. Continue reading »

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There are good reasons to think that the KGB arranged the murders of John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Robert F. Kennedy, Marilyn Monroe, Lee Harvey Oswald, Oswald’s KGB handler George de Mohrenschildt, Jack Ruby, JFK’s girlfriend Mary Meyer, columnist Dorothy Kilgallen, and ex-CIA director William Colby.

Note:  “good reasons”, not definitive proof.  Given the paucity of evidence, we might never obtain such proof.  Rather, in each case, I will argue that the KGB has become the leading suspect.  That is a useful finding, and it can guide further investigation that could result in the more definitive finding that It was all the KGB.

First, I will explain how the KGB has emerged as the prime suspect in the JFK assassination.  Not only was this the most important and best-known case; new evidence and interpretation point to the KGB and have implications for the other murders.  Second, I will touch on factors that have hampered resolution of these cases for many decades.  Third, I will treat each of the ten cases in summary fashion.  Fourth, I will compare the ten cases and identify characteristics of the KGB’s art of deniable murder.  Fifth, I will draw some conclusions.

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The KGB and JFK Continue reading »

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ST-C310-87-63Sometimes a storyteller misses the real meaning of the story.

By all accounts, the Cuban Missile Crisis was the most dangerous episode of the Cold War.  The United States and the Soviet Union came frighteningly close to launching nuclear attacks at each other.  Only fear, luck, and occasionally inspired negotiating moved them onto the path of resolving the crisis−via a humiliating Soviet withdrawal in the face of U.S. nuclear superiority.

Historians have identified many motives for the initial Soviet decision to place missiles in Cuba.  Continue reading »

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