A new pilot study plus a better understanding of the science and art of gargling suggest that it can be an effective adjuvant therapy against COVID-19.  At the same time, gargling can protect others, so we all have a vested interest in persuading each other to gargle.  In this video, Viktoria Nagudi discusses with Kenneth Dillon of Scientia Press gargling’s history, science, choice of gargles, and applications, including to reopening the economy and schools.  For further details, see https://www.scientiapress.com/mouthwash-oral-respiratory-infections.

Gargling versus COVID-19

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Slipping endlessly through the crack between oral and respiratory medicine, the humble mouthwash has slowly won more respect among savvy practitioners and patients as a solution for a range of indications.1 In Japan many millions of people gargle three times a day with green tea extracts or other mouthwashes to ward off upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), and Japanese clinical studies have confirmed the value of this approach (Furushima D et al. Molecules. 2018 Jul 20;23(7)). Worldwide, medical practitioners recommend gargling to patients; and many people on their own have decided that gargling makes sense, while millions swish with mouthwash to protect teeth and gums as well as to combat halitosis.

Still, for curious reasons, this formidable method of suppressing infections remains in medical limbo. Not because there is no need. The average American suffers 2.5 episodes of URTI per year, with high costs for treatment, lost days of work, and morbidity. URTIs also exacerbate asthma, and they can enter the lungs and prove fatal. Continue reading »

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Even though much inhaled COVID-19 virus immediately penetrates into the lungs, some remains in the throat where it replicates to very high numbers–for instance, a peak at 711,000,000 RNA copies per throat swab day 4 (Wölfel R et al.  Nature 2020;Apr 1).  According to a Reinforcement Model of COVID-19 infections, many of these replicates descend into the lungs, where they furnish a stream of reinforcements that cumulatively outweigh the replication of the initial penetrating dose.  Hence treating the throat with gargling seems highly desirable. Continue reading »

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Here are three overlooked methods of treating respiratory and disseminated infections that resemble the one caused by the COVID-19 virus.  Continue reading »

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Studies by Japanese researchers show that gargling is protective against respiratory infections.  Here is a letter that lays out the case for gargling against COVID-19. Continue reading »

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choosing_a_mouthwash_or_rinse_thats_right_for_you_lgIt is a little-known fact that one can treat respiratory infections quite effectively without drugs, primarily with the use of physical therapies and correctly applied remedies. Here are three methods:

1. Therapeutic Gargling (TG). Many respiratory viral and bacterial infections commence with a sore throat or a small infection in the inside lining of the mouth–for instance, inside the cheek. In these cases, the invading microbe appears to establish a beachhead in the throat or mouth lining where it can safely multiply before the immune system can develop a response sufficient to wipe it out. Once the numbers of microbes reach a high enough level, they can break out and spread the infection throughout the respiratory tract or even system-wide.

Continue reading »

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