Lunar Eclipse

Curiously, even though the Babylonians reported many details of celestial phenomena, the astrologers of Babylon are said not to have relied on actual observations.

According to a leading expert, “The existence of Babylonian omens for eclipses beginning and clearing in all four directions, or areas of the moon, despite the fact that a lunar eclipse will never begin on the western edge of the moon, indicates a lack of concern with observational veracity in favor of schematic order.”1

But there is another explanation that makes more sense of what the Babylonian astrologers were up to. Continue reading »

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KarnakSometimes we just need to listen carefully.  Definitely in regard to Karnak.

Egyptian priests told Herodotus, a careful listener, that four times since Egypt had become a kingdom “the Sun rose contrary to his wont; twice he rose where he now sets, and twice he set where he now rises.”

This evidence, and much else, was interpreted by Continue reading »

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Historian and scientific researcher Kenneth J. Dillon explains his theory entitled The Martian Theory of Mass Extinctions. For most of the past 4 billion years, the orbits of Mars and Earth were more eccentric than at present, and they intersected. The closest approaches of Mars led to the great mass extinctions of prehistory, while more distant approaches might account for many minor extinctions as well. The theory shows why the extinctions were serial events, why they differed in size, how they shaped the surface of Mars, and what made them so terrifically devastating. For further information, see https://www.scientiapress.com/extinctions.

The Martian Theory of Mass Extinctions

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A key component of Immanuel Velikovsky’s Venus theory was his contention that close passages of Venus caused Earth to topple over four times during the Bronze Age catastrophes.  Now we have a Revised Venus Theory that corrects inadequacies of the original theory and provides a cause of the inversions as well as approximate dates (2200, 1628, 1210, and 820 BC), an array of new evidence, and a link to the great mass extinctions of prehistory.  Viktoria Nagudi interviews Kenneth J. Dillon of Scientia Press.

Theory of the Reversing Earth

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Viktoria Nagudi interviews Kenneth J. Dillon of Scientia Press about his Theory of the Red Blood Cells.  According to the theory, the red blood cells, acting as a metacolony in real time, form the dermal-optic photoreceptor, the animal magnetoreceptor, the solution to the binding problem of consciousness, the ultrasensitive Psi receptor, and the chemiluminescent Original Immune System.  See also https://www.scientiapress.com/theory-of-the-red-blood-cells.

 

Theory of the Red Blood Cells

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In this video, Tom Lowe, director of Physicians Awareness UBI, and Kenneth J. Dillon, author of Healing Photons, discuss the history, science, challenges, and promise of Biophotonic Therapy.  Also known as ultraviolet blood irradiation, BT treats small amounts of blood with light in extracorporeal or intravenous modes.  BT was invented by Emmet Knott in the 1920s.  Hundreds of clinical studies have shown its effectiveness in various indications, e.g., against childhood asthma.  Thousands of practitioners around the world use it to treat a wide range of disorders.  BT is the leading phototherapeutic treatment of infectious diseases.  Continue reading »

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Among the deepest mysteries of ancient Egypt sphinxis the Great Sphinx of Giza.  Researchers, both professional and amateur, have painstakingly investigated its every aspect.1  Yet key puzzles remain, above all the question of why this colossal structure, the ancient world’s largest monument, was built in the first place.

It’s not that serious researchers and free-ranging speculators have not proposed explanations.  But every theory put forward falls well short of true persuasiveness or stumbles over inconvenient facts.  Here are three anomalies a correct theory should explain. Continue reading »

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caracolThe civilizations of Mesoamerica were full of mysteries.  What explains their fixation on Venus?  What led them to develop their intricate, highly precise calendars?  What can explain the little pecked-cross circles embedded in the landscape?  Why were these peoples so keenly bent on human sacrifice?  What were the Aztecs referring to when they said that this was the age of the Fifth Sun?

Fortunately, there is a skeleton key that can unlock these old secrets. Continue reading »

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water_running_fastHumankind needs a low-cost, low-side effects therapy for disseminated infections like HIV and multidrug-resistant TB.  In fact, circumstantial evidence and logic suggest that such a therapy exists.  But, for perverse reasons, it has never been properly tested.  That therapy is Biophotonic Therapy, which can be administered to the blood extracorporeally with various kinds of light or intravenously with a low-intensity laser.  BT has an excellent track record as a treatment of viral disorders ranging from bulbar spinal poliomyelitis to chronic hepatitis.  Invented in the United States in the 1920s, BT has been used extensively in Germany and Russia, but not in any clinical trial against HIV or MDR-TB.

Biophotonic Therapy, however, is not the only approach that calls out for testing against HIV, MDR-TB, and other disseminated infections.  Another candidate is Magnetized Water Therapy. Continue reading »

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Mad ScientistWouldn’t it be wonderful to master techniques that can lead to breakthroughs in your research? No doubt you already have your own arsenal of qualitative methods, but we all can benefit from learning more. For your consideration, here are five approaches to the various techniques used to arrive at the findings in the articles and books on this Website: Continue reading »

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What makes a theory good? In his canonical 1991 book Inference to the Best Explanation, Peter Lipton attempts to answer this fraught question. The philosopher identifies eleven explanatory virtues that are often placed within four groupings: evidential, coherential, aesthetic, and diachronic. Two others, James Beebe1 and Kenneth Dillon2, draw upon the same categorical schema to present four other virtues for consideration.  All fifteen are listed and defined in the following table: Continue reading »

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