osso

A new theory of the origin of the terrestrial planets solves longstanding scientific riddles and points to exciting opportunities for further investigation.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Kenneth J. Dillon, Intriguing Anomalies: An Introduction to Scientific Detective Work
[Scientific citations can be found in the original: Here.]
Chapter 9
Theory of the Red Blood Cells

red blood cells

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Phaistos DiskThe famous spiral disk found in Phaistos, Crete in 1908 has long defied efforts to translate it or even to identify the language in which it is written or what kind of a document it might be (it is here in color to aid analysis). Though many scholars and amateurs have proposed theories and even translations, none has seemed persuasive to the great majority of observers. A skeptical view holds that the disk is a forgery, but most scholars reject this. Many scholars agree that the small sample of language in the disk makes a breakthrough very unlikely unless and until other samples of the writing are found. Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , ,

Serpent Mound

420-meter long Great Serpent Mound in Ohio is the world’s longest effigy monument.  Archaeological investigations have yielded conflicting results about its initial construction date, and various theories regarding its meaning have failed to gain traction.  But a revised and enhanced version of the theory of Immanuel Velikovsky that the planet Venus was originally a comet that approached the Earth and caused great devastation neatly matches key characteristics of the Great Serpent Mound.

Recently, this Venus theory has gained additional credibility from a commonsensical explanation of how a comet-like Venus could have seemed to emerge from Jupiter as in ancient Hindu and Greek myths, including a simple, obvious reinterpretation of the Metis myth; and it has found powerful substantiation from a reinterpretation of the headdress of Queen Nefertari of Egypt, consort of Pharaoh Ramses II, in this image from Abu Simbel (Ramses II’s headdress appears to contain Mars with two moons and a tail, either borrowed from Venus in an encounter or from Martian dust stirred up by an encounter). Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

A top secret Canadian Security Intelligence Service report leaked on August 27, 2004 may provide the missing piece of evidence needed to identify the long elusive Anthrax Mailer of 2001.

While confirmation is still lacking, we now have enough shreds of evidence to piece together a theory of the case that resolves key anomalies. In turn, that theory can point us toward where we might find confirmatory evidence. Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Students have long struggled, often in vain, with the rules of Latin grammar. It’s not the parsing out of the various endings of nouns, adjectives, and verbs that causes the main trouble. One eventually memorizes them or learns to recognize them. Rather, the structure of sentences seems strange to the mind of an Indo-European native speaker. Also, Latin’s heavy use of gerundive and absolute constructions: all those verbal nouns entail a very different pattern of thinking than goes on in modern Indo-European languages. Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

220px-GD-EG-KomOmbo016Sekhmet (“The Mighty One”), the lion-headed goddess of ancient Egypt, was dreaded for her bloody rampages.  Yet she became the protector of kings and a favorite personal goddess of millions of Egyptians.

Why did Egyptians have a goddess who required such assiduous and even obsessive propitiation?  Why did other Egyptian goddesses play roles similar to Sekhmet’s?  What explains Sekhmet’s dual nature as destroyer and protector?  Why was she called the Eye of Ra, and why was she honored in the uraeus?  Why was she originally depicted with an oval disk on her head?  What do myths about Sekhmet tell us about the Bronze Age catastrophes?

We now have good answers to these questions.  But in order to understand them, we need to see why we should think that Sekhmet was Planet Venus.  And that requires us to investigate a major case of scientific rejectionism. Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

stonehenge3One of the world’s most famous monuments, Stonehenge abounds in mysteries and anomalies.

Why was Stonehenge built in the first place?  Why was it radically transformed shortly before 2500 BC into a masterpiece of megalithic architecture?  What explains the intricate, changing patterns of the stones over time?  Why were the lintels so carefully jointed, and why were they made almost perfectly level?  Why were the smooth, flat sides of the Great Trilithon of its Trilithon Horseshoe apparently oriented toward the winter solstice sunset in contrast to the other trilithons when the summer or winter solstice sunrises would seem much more worthy of attention?  Why all the extraordinary effort?  What purposes did Stonehenge serve?  How can we explain the possible astronomical alignments?

There are rather simple answers to most of these questions, but to get to them we need to set aside preconceptions and come to terms with something that isn’t so simple. Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Inquiring of the Dao at the Cave of Paradise

Who was the real Yellow Emperor?  Who was his antagonist Chi You, and what were their battles about?  What caused China’s gigantic floods?  Who was Archer Yi, what was his vermilion bow, how did he target and shoot down nine of ten suns, and why were there ten suns in the first place?

We now know the answers to these and other questions about ancient China.  These answers can lead us to a new understanding of Chinese history, of the worldwide Bronze Age catastrophes, and of the history of climate change.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

caracolThe civilizations of Mesoamerica were full of mysteries.  What explains their fixation on Venus?  What led them to develop their intricate, highly precise calendars?  What can explain the little pecked-cross circles embedded in the landscape?  Why were these peoples so keenly bent on human sacrifice?  What were the Aztecs referring to when they said that this was the age of the Fifth Sun?

Fortunately, there is a skeleton key that can unlock these old secrets. Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Among the deepest mysteries of ancient Egypt sphinxis the Great Sphinx of Giza.  Researchers, both professional and amateur, have painstakingly investigated its every aspect.1  Yet key puzzles remain, above all the question of why this colossal structure, the ancient world’s largest monument, was built in the first place.

It’s not that serious researchers and free-ranging speculators have not proposed explanations.  But every theory put forward falls well short of true persuasiveness or stumbles over inconvenient facts.  Here are three anomalies a correct theory should explain. Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

The_Earth_seen_from_Apollo_17There are good reasons to think that Earth has turned over on various occasions.  But who can be surprised that this notion—so removed from everyday experience and common sense—is less than instantaneously persuasive?

The good reasons include telling evidence in myths and narrative testimony of the ancients, embedded patterns in ancient culture that give evidence of an inversion, and the insights and arguments of two formidable scientists.  Now we can add new reasons that strengthen the case, we can comprehend that Earth is actually prone to inversion, and we can specify where to find more evidence.  We can also see that understanding inversions can not only help us correct errors in interpreting past planetary and Earth science but also provide clues relevant to climate change and other present and future terrestrial phenomena. Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Athena32immanuel-velikovsky-1

When Venus first appeared in the skies shortly before 2500 B.C., ancient peoples worldwide strove to come to terms with this brilliant and awesome new comet-planet (the best account is in Immanuel Velikovsky, Worlds in Collision, though it needs some revision).  That meant assigning the deity a gender and a name.

In the Near East, they tried both genders.  In its masculine incarnation, Venus became the Bull of Heaven (as Velikovsky pointed out, the comet-planet’s body blocked the sun’s rays from the central portion of its tail and thus it was seen as having two horns).  In its feminine version, Venus was called Ishtar or Astarte; and in the Levant Astarte was depicted with serpents in her hands—the twin tails of the comet.

In Greece, according to Velikovsky, planet Venus was originally named Athena. Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

winged-disk susa

New evidence and interpretation at the intersection of astronomy and religion can help us better understand the history of the Ancient Near East and of the origins of Islam.

In recent years, a revised and enhanced version of the theory of Immanuel Velikovsky that32immanuel-velikovsky-1 the planet Venus first entered the inner solar system as a comet with a bifurcated tail around 1500 B.C. (new evidence indicates shortly before 2500 B.C.) has found plentiful substantiation.  Now we have a much better explanation of the origin of Venus (it was pulled from the outer solar system by Jupiter’s gravity and, via tidal heating, became a comet with a long tail, €”overcoming the leading objection to Velikovsky’s theory).  Venus interacted with the Earth on a 52-year cycle during the Late Bronze Age, causing catastrophes worldwide.  And we now have a framework theory of the terrestrial planets into which these phenomena neatly fit and for which there is much telling evidence.  For Comet Venus, there is also newly interpreted, compelling iconographic and linguistic evidence.  The names of both Athena (A Fena, the Phoenician) and Poseidon (Bos eidon, the Bull of Heaven), for instance, referred to the double-tailed Venus.

So we can ask, with new-found confidence that the Ancients and Velikovsky were right about Venus, how can we use this to better decipher aspects of the culture of the Ancient Near East and of the background of Islam?

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Mars Earth NASAThere’s no shortage of candidates for the cause of the mass extinctions of prehistory. But experts have found flaws in every one.

Asteroid impact at Chicxulub, Yucatan clearly played a role in the Cretaceous-Tertiary (KT) extinction that wiped out the dinosaurs 65,000,000 years ago, though scientists differ on whether it actually caused the extinction because serious disruptions had begun hundreds of thousands of years before with the basalt flows of the Deccan Traps.1 Some researchers argue that giant basalt lava flows that poisoned the atmosphere and oceans played a central role in all five major extinctions. But no consensus exists on what forces triggered them.

Lurking in the background, however, is a quite plausible cause, one that would have possessed the power to set off the volcanic activity, air pollution, sea level shifts, loss of oxygen in oceans, climate changes, and other phenomena associated with the extinctions. Yet this cause does not seem to have been proposed, and proving or disproving it will require a good deal of investigation. Curiously, nonetheless, a significant body of relevant research has already been carried out in a subject parallel to the extinctions. But that research languishes in a scientific limbo.

The Martian Theory Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Lunar Eclipse

Curiously, even though Babylonian skywatchers reported many details of celestial phenomena, the astrologers of Babylon are said not to have relied on actual observations.

According to a leading expert, “The existence of Babylonian omens for eclipses beginning and clearing in all four directions, or areas of the moon, despite the fact that a lunar eclipse will never begin on the western edge of the moon, indicates a lack of concern with observational veracity in favor of schematic order.”1

This researcher uses the term “counterfactual” to refer to indications in the omen literature of the shadow of the Earth beginning on the western edge of the Moon. The conclusion is that there was no connection between astrology and astronomical observation; the omens were simply concocted according to schemata that suited the needs of the astrologers on the occasion.

But there is another explanation that makes more sense of what the Babylonian astrologers were up to. Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
Copyright © Scientia Press, 2016
© 2009 Designed by Sayontan Sinha Wordpress Themes