Kenneth J. Dillon, Intriguing Anomalies: An Introduction to Scientific Detective Work
[Scientific citations can be found in the original: Here.]
Chapter 9
Theory of the Red Blood Cells

red blood cells

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biophotonic therapy

  1. Biophotonic Therapy is the use of light to activate the healing properties of the blood. BT is photomedicine and has a well-characterized clinical profile. A dozen books and some 400 articles in the German, Russian, and English-language medical literature describe Biophotonic Therapy. Other common names for BT are Ultraviolet Blood Irradiation and Photoluminescence Therapy.
  2. In BT’s extracorporeal form, ultraviolet and visible light are used to treat a small amount of blood, which is then reinfused.
  3. In BT’s intravenous form, a low-intensity laser (generally at 632.8 nm) shines through a waveguide inside a needle into the blood. BT can also be administered sublingually. Continue reading »
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braceletFrom Kenneth J. Dillon, Intriguing Anomalies: An Introduction to Scientific Detective Work. Notes, bibliography, and images can be found in the original. For a brief overview, see “Ten Key Points about Medicinal Bracelets“.  Also, the URL http://www.medicinalbracelets.com is for sale.

 

Chapter 4

The Science of Medicinal Bracelets

The vision inspiring the study of medicinal bracelets is of an attractive, simple, easy-to-use, safe, naturally effective kind of medicine, one you can wear on your wrist. Medicinal bracelets also have much to teach us regarding the deeper patterns of physiology and nutrition. Continue reading »

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choosing_a_mouthwash_or_rinse_thats_right_for_you_lgSlipping endlessly through the crack between oral and respiratory medicine, the humble mouthwash has slowly won more respect among savvy practitioners and patients as a solution for a range of indications. In Japan many millions of people gargle three times a day with povidone-iodine or other mouthwashes to ward off upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), and Japanese clinical studies have confirmed the value of this approach. Worldwide, in a less-than-systematic and sometimes downright casual manner, medical practitioners recommend gargling to patients; and many people on their own have decided that gargling makes sense, while millions swish with mouthwash to protect teeth and gums as well as to combat halitosis.

Still, for curious reasons, this formidable method of suppressing infections remains in medical limbo. Not because there is no need. The average American suffers 2.5 episodes of URTI per year, with high costs for treatment, lost days of work, and morbidity. URTIs also exacerbate asthma, and they can enter the lungs and prove fatal. Continue reading »

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A top secret Canadian Security Intelligence Service report leaked on August 27, 2004 may provide the missing piece of evidence needed to identify the long elusive Anthrax Mailer of 2001.

While confirmation is still lacking, we now have enough shreds of evidence to piece together a theory of the case that resolves key anomalies. In turn, that theory can point us toward where we might find confirmatory evidence. Continue reading »

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HandpaineditedA 52-year old male in generally good health began to feel soreness and painful twinges in his fingers.  The inflammation was not in the knuckle joints but rather in the tissue surrounding them, which became increasingly red and sensitive to touch.  Having previously used Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) and methotrexate in succession to treat a case of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and having an old prescription for methotrexate, he obtained methotrexate from an online pharmacy and began to take it. Continue reading »

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220px-GD-EG-KomOmbo016Sekhmet (“The Mighty One”), the lion-headed goddess of ancient Egypt, was dreaded for her bloody rampages.  Yet she became the protector of kings and a favorite personal goddess of millions of Egyptians.

Why did Egyptians have a goddess who required such assiduous and even obsessive propitiation?  Why did other Egyptian goddesses play roles similar to Sekhmet’s?  What explains Sekhmet’s dual nature as destroyer and protector?  Why was she called the Eye of Ra, and why was she honored in the uraeus?  Why was she originally depicted with an oval disk on her head?  What do myths about Sekhmet tell us about the Bronze Age catastrophes?

We now have good answers to these questions.  But in order to understand them, we need to see why we should think that Sekhmet was Planet Venus.  And that requires us to investigate a major case of scientific rejectionism. Continue reading »

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bracelet-lge1.  Medicinal bracelets offer an attractive, simple, easy-to-use kind of natural medicine.  They can also teach us much about deeper patterns of physiology and nutrition.

2.  The bracelets can be composed of various minerals.  In practice, to avoid overdosing of trace elements, they tend to contain mainly copper and zinc.  The principles governing bracelets also apply to other kinds of jewelry, but here also one needs to steer clear of overdosing.  In South Asia silver anklets actually may be implicated Continue reading »

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Melencolia_I_(Durero)Negative thoughts have a way of inserting themselves unbidden into our minds. They reflect the unhappiness, perversity, and tragedy in our past and in the world about us. Only a Pollyanna would be ashamed to acknowledge them.

Negative thinking does little harm as a long as it simply passes like a shadow across the otherwise sunny landscape of the mind. But negative thoughts bear a burden of emotion. They tend to plant themselves squarely in our path and grow roots. We dwell on them, sometimes for hours at a time. In certain cases this can lead to genuine depression. More often, habitual negative thinking tends to make people unhappy, pessimistic, cynical, suspicious, and morose. It also wastes precious resources of time and emotional energy. Continue reading »

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saffronThe Afghan Herbal Medicines for Addiction and Depression project will conduct clinical trials of promising herbal medicines drawn from Afghanistan’s high-potential medicinal and aromatic plants (MAP) sector, in keeping with traditional Unani medicine. Addiction (overwhelmingly from opiates) and depression (some from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder from the horrors of Afghanistan’s wars, and some from mistreatment of women) represent especially salient targets, and they possess worldwide importance. Unani herbal medicines have been reported in preliminary Iranian clinical studies to be effective and safe in these indications, and they possess certain advantages over synthetic drugs. However, thorough, scientific, multicenter trials need to be done. Continue reading »

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